Shailene Woodley: We Need To Teach Teens How To Masturbate!

When she’s not drinking clay and bone broth, Shailene Woodley is looking out for the female youth of America.

Woodley, who plays Edward Snowden’s girlfriend, Lindsay Mills in Snowden (in theaters tomorrow), was interviewed by fashion site, Net-A-Porter.

Woodley talked about her upbringing (more on that in a bit), and her social justice causes.

One in particular that is close to her heart is sexual education.

“As a young woman you don’t learn how to pleasure yourself, you don’t learn what an orgasm should be, you don’t learn that you should have feelings of satisfaction,” she explained.

“I’ve always had a dream of making a book called There’s No Right Way to Masturbate.

“If masturbation were taught in school, I wonder how [many]fewer people would get herpes aged 16, or pregnant at 14?),” she pointed out.

That’s fair.

Woodley’s liberal stances may be influenced by her family.  Her father is a psychologist and her mom is a counselor, so there were probably a lot of conversations that had to do with channeling certain feelings.

Since her parents had a “revolving door policy” at their house, Woodley was exposed to all sorts of problems, including domestic violence.

“I came home to things that weren’t great,” she admitted.

“My family is super-f***** up in many ways, but they are also my everything.

“They would do anything for me, and I would do anything for them.

“That’s a lot more than most people can say about their families. I’m grateful for the s*** that happened.”

Things got weird on a day-to-day basis at Woodley’s house.  If she and her brother were fighting, their parents would make them hug it out on their front lawn.

For an hour.

“The whole time you’re just seething, you’re disliking this person with so much energy, but if you let go you have to stay there for an extra hour,” Woodley recalled.

“That was the kind of reverse, manipulative psychology my parents were into!”

In a move that goes against what every parent does these days, Woodley’s would defend her opponent if she got into a fight with someone her age.

“There were times in school, when someone said something really mean, it would hurt my feelings, and my parents weren’t on my side.

“They would be like, ‘I’m so sorry you’re feeling this way, but what do you think that person was feeling?’

“Oh, I hated it. Now, of course, I understand,” she said. 

“It enabled me to recognize that no-one’s evil, they’re probably hurting and can’t express themselves, get no love at home, so it’s repeated.

“It gave me a broader outlook: just put yourself in another person’s shoes.”

And here we are, years later…full of wisdom and clay.


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