People Can't Get Over The Dictionary's — Yes, The Dictionary's — Savage Clap Back

“This needs to go down in the dictionary as an example of ownership.”

It was a quiet Wednesday morning when Merriam-Webster — the most trustworthy dictionary of American English — sent out a cheeky tweet on how it’s OK to use “mad” to mean “angry.”

It was a quiet Wednesday morning when Merriam-Webster — the most trustworthy dictionary of American English — sent out a cheeky tweet on how it's OK to use "mad" to mean "angry."

Twitter: @MerriamWebster

In response, Gabriel Roth, a senior editor at Slate, decided to compare Merriam-Webster to a “chill parent who lets your friends come over and get high.”

In response, Gabriel Roth, a senior editor at Slate, decided to compare Merriam-Webster to a "chill parent who lets your friends come over and get high."

Twitter: @gabrielroth

In a series of tweets, Roth critiqued the dictionary, suggesting that it was “somehow narcissistically gratifying” for Merriam-Webster to act like the “chill” dictionary without rules.

In a series of tweets, Roth critiqued the dictionary, suggesting that it was "somehow narcissistically gratifying" for Merriam-Webster to act like the "chill" dictionary without rules.

Twitter: @gabrielroth

And then, in the most brutal clap back that has ever been served by a dictionary, Merriam-Webster told Roth: “No one cares how you feel.”

And then, in the most brutal clap back that has ever been served by a dictionary, Merriam-Webster told Roth: "No one cares how you feel."

Twitter: @MerriamWebster


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